Section C3Knock River Section 2 - CCG Interface to Grand Parade

C3/ Knock River Section 2 - CCG Interface to Grand Parade
  • Improved river channel
  • New / improved combined cycleway and walkway
  • New bridges
  • Grassland / wetland habitat creation
C3/ Knock River Section 2 - CCG Interface to Grand Parade
  • Improved river channel
  • New / improved combined cycleway and walkway
  • New bridges
  • Grassland / wetland habitat creation
C3/ Knock River Section 2 - CCG Interface to Grand Parade
  • Improved river channel
  • New / improved combined cycleway and walkway
  • New bridges
  • Grassland / wetland habitat creation
C3/ Knock River Section 2 - CCG Interface to Grand Parade
  • Improved river channel
  • New / improved combined cycleway and walkway
  • New bridges
  • Grassland / wetland habitat creation
C3/ Knock River Section 2 - CCG Interface to Grand Parade
  • Improved river channel
  • New / improved combined cycleway and walkway
  • New bridges
  • Grassland / wetland habitat creation

C3/ Knock River Section 2 - CCG Interface to Grand Parade

The reprofiling of the river in this area to a more natural course will; enhance biodiversity, create new habitats and will provide an ‘educational hub’ for local schools as well as provide flood alleviation for the local residents.

Lighting will feature throughout the park and the existing paths and fences will be improved in line with the rest of the greenway. A new toilet block will be built in the park.

Heritage/ Other Interesting Information

Orangefield Park - In 1938, Belfast Corporation (now Belfast City Council) bought part of the Orangefield estate from its then owners, the Blakiston- Houston family, to develop as a public park. Development plans were put on hold during World War II. The American Army was based here and trained in Orangefield Park from 1942-44. A German Prisoner of War camp was set up nearby. Today the park’s features include horticultural displays and a children’s playground. Orangefield Park Playing Fields, located within the park, contain a bowling green, soccer pitches, tennis courts and a cycling and BMX track.

Orangefield Velodrome- This 396 metre outdoor banked oval track is the only surviving facility of its kind in Northern Ireland. It opened for competition in 1957 and was used extensively throughout the 1950s and 1960s when track cycling was extremely popular. It continues to be used today. It was re-named the Tommy Givan track in 1981 in honour of the former National Track Champion, one of the stalwarts of track cycling in Belfast.