Section D2Connswater River Section 2 - Connswater Link Bridge to Newtownards Road

D2/ Connswater River Section 2 - Connswater Link Bridge to Newtownards Road
  • Refurbished weir
  • New / improved combined cycleway and walkway
  • Viewing platform
  • Pedestrian crossing
D2/ Connswater River Section 2 - Connswater Link Bridge to Newtownards Road
  • Refurbished weir
  • New / improved combined cycleway and walkway
  • Viewing platform
  • Pedestrian crossing
D2/ Connswater River Section 2 - Connswater Link Bridge to Newtownards Road
  • Refurbished weir
  • New / improved combined cycleway and walkway
  • Viewing platform
  • Pedestrian crossing
D2/ Connswater River Section 2 - Connswater Link Bridge to Newtownards Road
  • Refurbished weir
  • New / improved combined cycleway and walkway
  • Viewing platform
  • Pedestrian crossing
D2/ Connswater River Section 2 - Connswater Link Bridge to Newtownards Road
  • Refurbished weir
  • New / improved combined cycleway and walkway
  • Viewing platform
  • Pedestrian crossing
D2/ Connswater River Section 2 - Connswater Link Bridge to Newtownards Road
  • Refurbished weir
  • New / improved combined cycleway and walkway
  • Viewing platform
  • Pedestrian crossing

D2/ Connswater River Section 2 - Connswater Link Bridge to Newtownards Road

This area at the Newtownards Road will benefit from improved paths, a refurbished weir which will become a feature and a viewing platform. This section will improve the existing links between the Newtownards Road and Connswater Shopping Centre.

Heritage / Other Interesting Information

Connswater Bridge - a bridge was built over the Connswater in 1758 following the death of Richard McCleery. He drowned while using the stepping stones that preceded the New Bridge. The road built here was then named the Newtownards Road. The present bridge was widened in 1890.

Belfast Ropeworks - The Belfast Ropeworks Company was incorporated in 1876 following a huge demand for ropes from the growing shipbuilding industry. Barges on the Connswater River transported raw materials to the Ropeworks and took the finished rope back to the shipyard on Queen’s Island. The Belfast Ropeworks Company became the world’s largest manufacturer of rope and twine during the early 20th century. One third of the ropes (a quarter of a million tonnes) required by the war office during the Second World War were made at the Belfast Ropeworks. The Ropeworks continued to trade until 1983.